HumanioraDesire and Pleasure in the Branded Reality Show as a Discursive Psychoanalysis

by: B. S. Wijaya*

DOI: 10.22146/jh.v27i1.6406

ABSTRACT

The study of branded reality show is still very limited, especially in the perspective of discursive psychoanalysis. In fact, the phenomenon of reality show is currently growing in the television industry, so brands are inspired to create similar programs. This paper aims to analyze the desire and pleasure of success that are presented and disclosed by branded reality show ‘Diplomat Success Challenge’ on a national TV channel in Indonesia. Using discursive psychoanalysis approach in the Lacanian perspective, author found that participants in the ‘Diplomat Success Challenge’ saw competitors (other participants) as ‘other’ in imaginary phase which is the object of desire in having the pleasure of success, while the audience used ​​the participants as reflection of their desire and pleasure of success. There are two tendencies of the spectatorship style in responding to the discourse. In one hand the audiences tend to be more emphatic and figural, on the other hand they tend to be more logic, analytical and systematic. In addition, the desire and pleasure of success in the ‘Diplomat Success Challenge’ becomes a powerful discourse that alienated negative issues related to the Diplomat as a tobacco product brand. Thus, the politics of reality through a discourse of success in the branded reality show has successfully infiltrated into the subconscious and control the public consciousness.

Keywords: Desire and Pleasure of Success, Branded Reality Show, ‘Diplomat Success Challenge’, Discursive Psychoanalysis, Spectatorship

* Brand scientist, strategist & culturalist. E-mail: bswijaya98@yahoo.com

See the full-text paper here: Desire and Pleasure in the Branded Reality Show

Cite this article –APA Style– as follow (kutip artikel ini dengan penulisan di daftar pustaka sbb):

Wijaya, B. S. (2015). Desire and Pleasure in the Branded Reality Show as a Discursive Psychoanalysis. Humaniora, 27 (1): 27-41. DOI: 10.22146/jh.v27i1.6406

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